The Protestant Reformation

Martin Luther, John Calvin, and several others are recognized as the fathers of the Protestant reformation.1 The word fathers used this way means those who originate or institute something. They surely did so, bringing about one of world history’s most important revolutions. 1. They are...
“Stranger than fiction,” the old saying goes about the truth. The tales of history and the events of today prove this to be true, practically on a daily basis. This is the brief story of a man unique in all history: burned in effigy1 for heresy by the Catholics and burned in reality by the...
It’s instructive to see how Luther moved from tolerance to dogma as his power and certainty grew. One comes across many contradictions along the way and sees that his teaching is not to be easily understood. He proclaimed freedom of conscience in matters of faith, and the right of every individual...
Since the establishment of Christianity, the ones who were willing to do God’s will have sensed that something was wrong.
Martin Luther and John Calvin, the fathers of the Protestant Reformation, taught that salvation was by grace through faith in Jesus Christ, and that any who lack such saving faith are condemned to eternal damnation, regardless of whether they have ever had the chance to hear the gospel.
Since we know that the Bible is an inspired book, every word being God-breathed and full of meaning, then what would motivate a preacher to come against a whole book of the Bible and say it was not from God?
The Pilgrims were part of a greater movement — stretching back to Wycliffe and Tyndale — to place the Scriptures into the hands of the common man. Yet what they tried to do with those Scriptures is virtually unknown, even though their moving story is told year after year in America.
The ninety-five theses Martin Luther posted on the door of Wittenberg Church on October 31, 1517, are very famous. They began a revolution in world affairs religiously, politically, and even socially. Four years later he was called to account before the greatest spiritual and secular powers on...
Christianity’s persecution of the Jews has dominated Jewish history since the Christianization of the Roman Empire under the Emperor Constantine in the early fourth century AD. To the Jews, the cross has been as much a symbol of persecution and terror as the swastika, only provoking dread.
If any man hears my words, and believes not, I judge him not. (John 12:41) That declaration spoken by our Master 2000 years ago established for all time how those who believe in Him should treat those who don’t believe.
Just as the specter of Jonestown brands anyone who tries to live communally today, a far more serious tragedy darkened the Anabaptist movement in the sixteenth century. Anabaptist radicals seized the city of Münster in February 1534, to create, by force, a “New Zion.”

The Twelve Tribes is a confederation of twelve self-governing tribes, composed of self-governing communities. We are disciples of the Son of God whose name in Hebrew is Yahshua. We follow the pattern of the early church in Acts 2:44 and 4:32, truly believing everything that is written in the Old and New Covenants of the Bible, and sharing all things in common.